×
Other destinations ×

The best beaches in Almería: from wild shores to urban sands

The province of Almería has a coastline stretching more than 100 km, complete with virgin beaches in hidden coves and well-equipped urban beaches offering water sports and all modern facilities. There are plenty of options and the choice is yours. Read on as we reveal some the best. 

Virgin beaches at Cabo de Gata  

Almería’s virgin beaches are mostly concentrated in the predominantly volcanic landscape of the Cabo de Gata area. The fine sand and gentle turquoise waters really set the scene for a peaceful, worry-free day.  

Environmental protection is firmly on the agenda not just in the Parque Natural Cabo de Gata-Níjar but throughout Almería, and more and more businesses are building this concept into their model. If you take a trip to the beaches and coves in this natural park (thankfully, there has been little environmental damage in area), please do so responsibly: avoid bringing plastic containers, and don’t leave them behind if you do; take all your waste with you; and if you find anything that could harm the flora and fauna, put it in the bin. 

Playa Cabo de Gata

Environmental protection is firmly on the agenda not just in the Parque Natural Cabo de Gata-Níjar but throughout Almería, and more and more businesses are building this concept into their model. If you take a trip to the beaches and coves in this natural park (thankfully, there has been little environmental damage in area), please do so responsibly: avoid bringing plastic containers, and don’t leave them behind if you do; take all your waste with you; and if you find anything that could harm the flora and fauna, put it in the bin. 

 

 

Some of the largest and most famous beaches in the natural park are Playa de los Muertos (link: Playa de los Muertos), Playa de Mónsul and Playa de los Genoveses. However, Cabo de Gata is packed full of other smaller beaches and coves. We’ve tried to list the least popular beaches, but if you’re really looking to disconnect from civilisation you should still avoid visiting in July and August.  

It’s time to discover some of Almería’s hidden treasures. 

  • Cala del Plomo  

When you reach this cove, stop for a minute and contemplate the vista before you. This is nature in its pure state, and there isn’t one building, cable or track along this 200-metre stretch of beach. Kids will delight in the tranquil waters and exploring the rocks.  

  • Cala de Enmedio 

This beach is accessible on foot or by boat, which gives some clue as to what you’ll find there: a natural, private space with few people around. It’s just 150 m long and the sand here is white and extremely fine. The water is a magnificent shade of turquoise, though the most striking feature in this cove are the fossilised dune formations at the water’s edge. Walk along them to really appreciate the gorgeous blues of the sea.

Cala de Enmedio

Cala de Enmedio

  • Cala Rajá 

Another small beach that requires a bit of effort to get to. It may be the furthest beach from any town or village in Cabo de Gata, but the reward when you get there is worth it. Don’t forget to pack your snorkel so that you can explore life under the water in this marine protection area. Above the surface, the cove is home to endemic plant life, and the cliffs will protect you from the cool easterly winds.  

  • Los Escullos 

The beaches and coves of Los Escullos offer several places for swimming. The largest beach is Playa del Arco. If you fancy a spot of diving, head to the Calas del Embarcadero. Other coves – Cala de la Piedra Galera, Cala Cortada and Cala Tomate – are harder to reach and therefore quieter, wilder and more special.  

Los Escullos

Eroded rocks at Los Escullos

  • Cala San Pedro 

The long walk to this cove means it’s usually a secluded spot all year round. The panoramic views en route will really awaken your senses. The ruins of the Castillo de San Pedro (15th century) are set against an almost desert-like landscape, complete with a swathe of plant life that sits in stark contrast to the colour of the crystal-clear waters. 

The cove has a potable water spring and has been inhabited for some time by a community that lives in contact with nature, grows its own crops, runs a small bar and sells crafts.  

  • Urban beaches in Almería  

Almería’s wild coastline is undoubtedly special, but some of the region’s urban beaches are worth checking out too. The array of facilities, restaurants and water sports may mean they’re a better choice for families or those looking for the buzz of civilisation.  

Playa de Aguamarga

The town of Agua Amarga and it´s beach

  • Playa de Agua Amarga 

Still within the Parque Natural Cabo de Gata, Playa de Agua Amarga (link: What to see in Agua Amarga) is one of Almería’s few urban coves. This 500-metre sandy stretch runs along almost the entire village. It’s perfect if you want accessibility, accommodation and restaurants, and the lifeguard service makes it a good choice for families (link: Almería with kids). At Playa de Agua Amarga you can enjoy all the advantages of an urban beach and still visit more secluded coves just a few kilometres away, including Cala del Plomo and Cala de Enmedio.  

Related plans